INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR FORENSIC AND LEGAL LINGUISTICS

Conferences

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Student Travel Awards – 16th Biennial Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics 

Student Travel Awards – 16th Biennial Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics

Up to three travel awards are available for postgraduate students to present a paper at the 16th Biennial IAFLL Conference in Manila, Philippines. Each award provides a waiver of conference registration fees and reimburses reasonable travel costs up to a maximum of US $1,000.

The awards acknowledge the contributions by distinguished scholars to the understanding of forensic linguistics and language of the law and their promotion of the field. The Roger Shuy Award honours Professor Shuy for his contributions to FL scholarship and his generous founding gift of a student travel award. The Malcolm Coulthard Award honours the founding president of the then International Association of Forensic Linguists. The Teresa M. Turell Award honours the former president of the Association, and preference for the award in her honour will be given to students from Spanish-speaking or Portuguese-speaking countries.

The awards are available to postgraduate students whose paper has been accepted for presentation at the conference and who present the paper in person. Preference will be given to applicants who would otherwise find travel expenses to the conference prohibitive and provide evidence of the potential to contribute to the development and promotion of the discipline of forensic linguistics.

Each application should be in the form of a 400-500 word statement detailing the applicant’s qualifications and academic experience and addressing the criteria above. The abstract of the paper the applicant intends to present at the conference should also be appended to the email message. A single application will suffice for all the awards.

Awardees will be chosen by a committee comprising Dr Jennifer Glougie (IAFLL vice-president); Dr Sheila Queralt (IAFLL treasurer); Dr Nicci MacLeod (IAFLL Secretary); Dr Marilu Madrunio (IAFLL & conference organising committee).

The deadline for receipt of applications is 28 April 2023. Winners will be announced by 22 May 2023.

Applications should be submitted by email to Dr Nicci MacLeod: n(dot)macleod5(at)aston(dot)ac(dot)uk. All applications will be acknowledged.

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Reflection on the 4th European Conference of the IAFLL

A big thank you to Dakota Wing for offering these reflections the 4th European Conference of the IAFLL, Porto 18-21 July 2022.

On July 18-21, 2022 the 4th European Conference of the IAFLL was hosted by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Porto, in Porto, Portugal. As the first IAFLL in-person event since 2019, the conference attracted delegates from around the world, and indeed, it was an exciting time to reunite with the IAFLL community face-to-face. The conference consisted of a pre-conference workshop on Aston’s FoLD, a presidential address by IAFLL President Dr. Isabel Picornell, plenaries by  Professor Janet Ainsworth, Professor Karen McAuliffe, Professor Luísa Neto, Professor Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira, and Professor Malcolm Coulthard, 22 parallel sessions with talks on a wide array of forensic and legal linguistic topics, a poster session, various social events, delicious food and drinks, and of course, a wonderful group of forensic and legal linguists!

The conference theme focused on rigour and transparency in forensic linguistics, and this was apparent across the various conference activities. For example, Dr. Picornell’s presidential address highlighted the role that we, as forensic linguists consulting on cases, have in explaining our methods and findings not only to triers of fact, but also to lawyers who engage our services as it is the lawyers who are initially responsible for disclosing experts and contextualizing our research question(s) and findings as relevant to the case at hand. This insight is important for (at least) two reasons: First, it speaks to the importance of sharing experiences of being a practicing forensic linguist and being transparent in these experiences for others to learn from. Many other talks (e.g., Professor Coulthard’s plenary and the session titled ‘forensic linguistics casework’) also discussed experiences of consulting forensic linguists. I find that in sharing such experiences, it allows us to think about how methods are applied and what types of research questions we can ask (and try to answer), and it helps identify research gaps. That is, in being transparent in our experiences, it helps improve the rigour of our methods and approaches. It also fosters a mentorship-like environment in which students, emerging scholars, and early-career forensic linguistic practitioners can learn first-hand about the realities of expert consulting. Often, consulting experts (especially those who have been foundational in developing the field into what it is today) begin consulting without training in being an expert witness, so to be able to learn from these experiences is not only a privilege but should also be encouraged to help further advance the field (also see the expert witness training supported by the IAFLL).

Second, Dr. Picornell’s talk reminds us to thoroughly consider the (often multiple and variable) audiences who we are presenting our analyses to. Unfortunately, as much as I like to think that everyone should be as excited about forensic linguistics as I am, not everyone is. Who we’re communicating our findings to, and how, is something that I considered as I attended other talks throughout the next three days of conference activities. It became clear that without being transparent in what we’re doing, how we’re doing it, and why we’re doing it, the end result (our findings) may have little impact on the audience (likewise, as Professor Neto also pointed out, a lack of transparency may obscure access to justice). Thankfully, this conference was definitely impactful! Despite attending talks that I have little background knowledge of, I was constantly impressed at how accessible presenters made their talks (Exhibit A: Dr. Ainsworth made defamation law incredibly entertaining!). This ensured that findings were accurately conveyed and allowed for meaningful discussions from individuals with different backgrounds and perspectives. Being able to have such engaging discussions aids in providing presenters with valuable feedback (which was especially beneficial for me as I was presenting preliminary findings from my dissertation) and, as I witnessed on multiple occasions, creates opportunities for future collaborations. This was enhanced by the friendly and respectful environment created by the conference organizers (and the vinho verde probably helped) that fostered a community of scholars with a shared goal of advancing the field of forensic and legal linguistics.

The commitment to the advancement of the field was apparent in the diversity of the research presented at the conference. Presenters were from around the world, discussing legal contexts and data from varying cultures and languages, and applying a variety of theories and methodologies (actually, Professor McAuliffe’s plenary alone addressed all of this!). Despite these apparent differences, the conference was cohesive and emphasized the multidisciplinary nature of the field, which facilitated discussions with insightful parallels within and across sessions (no doubt thanks to the organizing committee’s thoughtful planning and organizing). Talks were aimed at both improving existing methods and our understanding of (socio)linguistic theories and applying various methods and theories to forensic and legal data. I had the opportunity to attend talks in topics relating to police discourse, authorship analysis, language crimes, suicide notes, and forensic linguistic casework. One session, on ‘Ethics, Standards and Practice’ was particularly interesting as the talks drew specific attention to problems in the field and made me reflect critically about my own work. Thinking of the future, I hope the IAFLL community considers the topics (and proposed suggestions) highlighted in these talks and the subsequent discussions. I also look forward to reading publications (in reputable journals that Professor Dinis-Oliveira would approve of) of the important work I got to observe, and of the talks that I missed that occurred during parallel sessions.

As a student and emerging scholar, presenting at this conference, hearing about innovative research, engaging in thought-provoking discussions, and meeting old and new friends was truly a valuable experience. A big Thank You to Dr. Rui Sousa-Silva, the organizing committee, and the volunteers who clearly worked long and hard to make this (long anticipated) conference the success it was. And also, a thank you to the IAFLL Executive, the plenary speakers, the session chairs, the sponsors, the presenters, and all the attendees for contributing to what was a fantastic conference. I’m pleased to say, in full transparency and with extreme rigour, that I had a great time and can’t wait for the 16th Biennial Conference of the IAFLL at the University of Santo Tomas in the Philippines!

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Call for Papers: IAFLL16 – 16th Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics

The 16th Biennial Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics (IAFLL) will be hosted by the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, the Philippines. With the theme Forensic Linguistics: Strengthening Foundations, Rethinking Paradigms, and Navigating New Horizons, IAFLL 16 aims to engage the participants in the discussion on the groundwork, current trends and issues, and prospects in Forensic Linguistics and will be held from July 4-6, 2023.

We welcome proposals for individual papers and poster presentations dealing with forensic linguistics/language and the law including, but not limited to:

Legal languages:

  • The history of legal languages
  • The role of literacy in legal languages
  • Legal genres
  • Critical approaches to legal languages
  • Language education for law professionals

Legal discourse:

  • Courtroom, police and prison discourse
  • Investigative interviewing
  • Multilingual matters in legal contexts
  • Power and the law
  • The comprehensibility of legal documents
  • Interviews with vulnerable witnesses in the legal system

Language minorities and the legal system:

  • Linguistic disadvantage before the law
  • Courtroom interpreting and translation
  • Human Rights matters

Law on language:

  • Language policy and linguistic rights
  • Offensive language and hate speech
  • The linguist as expert witness

Linguistic evidence and investigative linguistics:

  • Forensic phonetics and speaker identification
  • Forensic stylistics
  • Linguistic determination of nationality
  • Authorship analysis
  • Plagiarism detection and analysis
  • Trademark disputes
  • Consumer product warnings
  • Deception and fraud

Other Related Sub-Themes:

  • Computational forensic linguistics
  • Cybercrime
  • Online identities and interactive multimodal communication
  • Multimodal approaches to forensic linguistics
  • Intercultural mediation
  • Comparative law
  • Forensic communication
  • Ethics and deontology in Forensic Linguistics

Abstracts of no more than 500 words, including references, should be sent via https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=iafll16 by November 15, 2022. Please note that there is no need to upload a full paper.

Website: https://iafll16.wordpress.com

Venue: The conference will be held live at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, the Philippines, via a fully online format, or a combination of the two – a hybrid format.

Plenary speakers:

  • Prof. Tim Grant – UK
  • Dr. Isabel Picornell – UK
  • Dr. Jennifer Glougie – Canada
  • Prof. Nathalie Schilling – USA
  • Dr. Richard Powell – Japan
  • Dr. Susanto – Indonesia

Themed Panel Presentations (1st day)

Transdisciplinary Approach to Forensic Linguistics:

  • Linguistics, Law and Architecture: Dr. Marilu R. Madrunio (University of Santo Tomas, Manila, the Philippines)
  • Linguistics, Law and Data Science: Atty. Senando Angelo Santiago (University of the Philippines, Quezon City, the Philippines)
  • Linguistics, Law and Anthropology: Dr. Laura Smith-Khan (University of Technology Sydney, Australia)

*NB Another themed panel may be created for the 2nd day.

Any questions can be directed to the organising team at iafll16ph@gmail.com.

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IAFLL Porto 2022 – Student bursary winners

IAFLL Porto 2022 – Student Bursary winners

The IAFLL Executive Committee would like to send its congratulations to the five recipients of the bursaries for the 4th European Conference of the IAFLL in Porto. Each winner will be awarded up to €400 to cover expenses to attend the conference. The winners, their affiliations and the titles of the their talks are:

 

  • Cheima Bouchrara (University of Surrey, UK)
    “Ladies and gentlemen of the jury”: Uncovering discursive and linguistic patterns in closing arguments in US criminal trials
  • Natalie Jones (University of Leeds, UK)
    Representing realities in Derek Chauvin’s criminal trial: Prosecution and defence strategies in opening speeches
  • Andriana Maria Korasidi (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece) (with George Mikros)
    Where Edges meet: Identifying ideological and emotional commonalities in far-left and far-right terrorist Greek groups based on a corpus-driven analysis
  • Oluwole Sanni (University of Warsaw, Poland)
    Discourse Strategies and Positioning Moves in Selected African Suicide Notes
  • Dakota Wing (York University, Canada)
    From opinion to fact: ‘Beliefs’ and subjective descriptors in Canadian police reports

 

On behalf of the IAFLL Executive Committee

David Wright, Communications Officer

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IAFLL Porto 2022 – Student Bursaries

IAFLL Porto 2022 – Student Bursaries

A reminder that the IAFLL will award five bursaries to students whose abstracts were accepted for presentation at the 4th European Conference of the IAFLL in Porto, July 2022. Each bursary will be funded up to 400 Euros. Applicants should email the IAFLL Secretary, Dr Nicci MacLeod: n.macleod5@aston.ac.uk, with their name and affiliation, proof of their student status and a brief statement (up to 250 words) explaining why their application is worth being funded. Please DO NOT attach a copy of the abstract or the title of your presentation at this stage. The deadline to apply for a student bursary is 23rd May 2022, and winners will be notified by the 30th May in time to register at the Early Bird rate.

On behalf of the IAFLL Executive Committee

David Wright, Communications Officer

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2nd Call for Papers: 4th European Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics – Porto, Portugal, July 18-21, 2022

2nd Call for Papers – deadline: 12 March 2022

The University of Porto, in Portugal, will host the 4th European Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics (IAFLL) on the theme of ‘Rigour and Transparency in Forensic Linguistics’. The conference, which is organised by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, aims to engage the participants in the debate of rigour and transparency in Forensic Linguistics, and will be held from 18 to 21 July 2022.


SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Abstract submissions are invited for INDIVIDUAL PAPERS, POSTERS and COLLOQUIA, in English or in Portuguese. All papers must be original and not simultaneously submitted to another journal or conference.

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INDIVIDUAL PAPERS: Individual papers are invited for presentations of 20 minutes, with a further 10 minutes for questions. Abstracts of no more than 300 words, including references, should be sent via the submissions page (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=iafllporto2022) by 12 March 2022. Please do not include your name, affiliation and email address in the abstract itself.  Acceptance of proposals may be limited to one paper per presenter if more than one proposal is submitted by the same author(s). Notifications of acceptance will be communicated by 7 April 2022

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POSTERS: Proposals for posters of no more than 300 words, including references, should be sent via the submissions page (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=iafllporto2022) by 12 March 2022. Posters, which will be on display during the conference, should be of A0 size (841mm x 1189mm) in portrait orientation. Notifications of acceptance will be communicated by 31 March 2022. Notifications of acceptance will be communicated by 7 April 2022.

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Submissions are invited for work dealing with forensic linguistics / language and the law including, but not limited to:

.

Legal Languages:

  • The history of legal languages
  • The role of literacy in legal languages
  • Legal genres
  • Critical approaches to legal languages
  • Language education for law professionals

Legal Discourse:

  • Courtroom, police and prison discourse
  • Investigative interviewing
  • Multilingual matters in legal contexts
  • Power and the law
  • The comprehensibility of legal documents
  • Interviews with vulnerable witnesses in the legal system

Language minorities and the legal system:

  • Linguistic disadvantage before the law
  • Courtroom interpreting and translation
  • Human Rights matters

Law on language:

  • Language policy and linguistic rights
  • Offensive language and hate speech
  • The linguist as expert witness

Linguistic evidence and investigative linguistics:

  • Forensic phonetics and speaker identification
  • Forensic stylistics
  • Linguistic determination of nationality
  • Authorship analysis
  • Plagiarism detection and analysis
  • Trademark disputes
  • Consumer product warnings
  • Deception and fraud

Other Related Sub-Themes:

  • Computational Forensic Linguistics
  • Cybercrime
  • Online identities and interactive multimodal communication
  • Multimodal approaches to forensic linguistics
  • Intercultural mediation
  • Comparative law
  • Forensic communication
  • Ethics and deontology in Forensic Linguistics

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Official language: The official language of the conference is English. However, there will be a special track in Portuguese. To participate in this special track, please submit your abstract in Portuguese.

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Venue: The conference will be held in Porto (Portugal), at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Porto. The Organising Committee is planning a live event so at this moment online attendance is not planned.

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COVID-19: The Conference, considering the state of the pandemic in Portugal at the moment, will be hosted live. No hybrid/online alternatives are planned at this stage, so only live attendance will be allowed. We may need to limit the number of participants if the context of the pandemic so requires.

Keynote speakers will be announced soon.

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Contact: All questions about submissions should be emailed to forensic.linguistics@letras.up.pt.

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16th Biennial IAFLL conference to be hosted by the University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines in 2023

The IAFLL Executive Committee has voted unanimously for the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, Philippines to host the 16th Biennial Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics.

The conference will take place between 4 – 6 July 2023. The conference is being planned as an in-person event. However, the hosts are preparing an alternative online/hybrid version of the conference in parallel, should the global circumstances at the time prevent a (fully) in person meeting. More information regarding theme, Call for Papers, registration, travel and accommodation arrangements will be published in due course.

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On behalf of the IAFLL Executive Committee

David Wright, Communications Officer

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IAFLL News Briefing – December 2021

This news briefing is the first since a very busy few months of change for our Association, including the election of a new Executive Committee. We are now led by the new President of the association Isabel Picornell. The elections also saw Jennifer Glougie become Vice-President, Nicci MacLeod become Secretary, Sheila Queralt become Treasurer and David Wright become Communications Officer. These officers are joined on the committee by Members at Large Marilu Madrunio, Andrea Nini and Dana Roemling. The new Executive Committee would like thank Janet Ainsworth as outgoing President (and now non-voting member of the committee) and the rest of the team for their tireless work for the association and the forensic linguistic community more widely, and for leaving the incoming committee in an excellent position going forwards.

In September the membership voted on two important issues. First, a vote passed on changing the name of the association to the ‘International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics’ (IAFLL). Also, the membership voted to update the IAFLL Constitution for the first time since 2005. These votes ushered in a new era for balloting the membership of our association. It was the first time in the history of the association that all members from across the world were able to vote online without having to attend the IAFLL biennial conference. We are thankful to the previous Executive Committee for setting up the infrastructure to facilitate this, and we are delighted with such a high turnout on votes across all issues.

September also saw the 15th Biennial Conference of the IAFLL organised and hosted online by the Aston Institute for Forensic Linguistics (AIFL) at Aston University. The organising team at Aston deserve high praise for pivoting the conference to an online platform from what was originally planned as a face-to-face event. The conference was a huge success, with over 110 talks by speakers from some 26 countries worldwide. The event saw the unveiling of the Aston Institute’s Forensic Linguistic Databank (FoLD), which is sure to be an important development for the discipline. At the same time, Tim Grant and Tammy Gales announced their Cambridge University Press book series Elements in Forensic Linguistics which provides a new dedicated outlet for the publication of forensic linguistic work.

Continuing with the theme of conferences, the University of Porto have recently announced their first Call for Papers for the 2022 Conference of the IAFLL on the theme of ‘Rigour and Transparency in Forensic Linguistics’. Meanwhile, one of the first jobs for the new Executive Committee was to publish a Call for Bids to host the 2023 and 2025 biennial IAFLL conferences. The deadline for proposals was on 1 December and the committee are now evaluating the bids they have received.

To end, we would like to thank all of our members for all of their dedicated and committed hard work in teaching, researching and practising forensic linguistics over 2021, in what proved to be a period of continued challenge, uncertainty and change. We send all of our best wishes to our members for what is left of 2021 and a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year.

On behalf of the IAFLL Executive Committee

David Wright, Communications Officer

Conferences, Latest News

Call for papers: 2022 Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics – Porto, Portugal, July 18-21, 2022

Call for Papers: IAFLL Porto 2022

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2022 Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics. On the theme of ‘Rigour and Transparency in Forensic Linguistics’

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The University of Porto, in Portugal, will host the 2022 Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics (IAFLL) on the theme of ‘Rigour and Transparency in Forensic Linguistics’. The conference, which is organised by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, aims to engage the participants in the debate of rigour and transparency in Forensic Linguistics, and will be held from 18 to 21 July 2022.

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Submission Guidelines
Abstract submissions are invited for INDIVIDUAL PAPERS, POSTERS and COLLOQUIA, in English or in Portuguese. All papers must be original and not simultaneously submitted to another journal or conference.

.

INDIVIDUAL PAPERS: Individual papers are invited for presentations of 20 minutes, with a further 10 minutes for questions. Abstracts of no more than 300 words, including references, should be sent via the submissions page (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=iafllporto2022) by 15 December 2021 (to be considered in the first call). Please do not include your name, affiliation and email address in the abstract itself. Notifications of acceptance of the first call for papers will be communicated by 15 January 2022. Acceptance of proposals may be limited to one paper per presenter if more than one proposal is submitted by the same author(s).

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POSTERS: Proposals for posters of no more than 300 words, including references, should be sent via the submissions page (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=iafllporto2022) by 28 February 2022. Posters, which will be on display during the conference, should be of A0 size (841mm x 1189mm) in portrait orientation. Notifications of acceptance will be communicated by 31 March 2022.

.

Submissions are invited for work dealing with forensic linguistics / language and the law including, but not limited to:

.

Legal Languages:

  • The history of legal languages
  • The role of literacy in legal languages
  • Legal genres
  • Critical approaches to legal languages
  • Language education for law professionals

Legal Discourse:

  • Courtroom, police and prison discourse
  • Investigative interviewing
  • Multilingual matters in legal contexts
  • Power and the law
  • The comprehensibility of legal documents
  • Interviews with vulnerable witnesses in the legal system

Language minorities and the legal system:

  • Linguistic disadvantage before the law
  • Courtroom interpreting and translation
  • Human Rights matters

Law on language:

  • Language policy and linguistic rights
  • Offensive language and hate speech
  • The linguist as expert witness

Linguistic evidence and investigative linguistics:

  • Forensic phonetics and speaker identification
  • Forensic stylistics
  • Linguistic determination of nationality
  • Authorship analysis
  • Plagiarism detection and analysis
  • Trademark disputes
  • Consumer product warnings
  • Deception and fraud

Other Related Sub-Themes:

  • Computational Forensic Linguistics
  • Cybercrime
  • Online identities and interactive multimodal communication
  • Multimodal approaches to forensic linguistics
  • Intercultural mediation
  • Comparative law
  • Forensic communication
  • Ethics and deontology in Forensic Linguistics

.

Official language: The official language of the 2022 Conference of the International Association for Forensic and Legal Linguistics on the theme of Rigour and Transparency in Forensic Linguistics is English. However, there will be a special track in Portuguese. To participate in this special track, please submit your abstract in Portuguese.

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Venue: The conference will be held in Porto (Portugal), at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Porto. The Organising Committee is planning a live event so at this moment online attendance is not planned.

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COVID-19: The 2022 Conference, considering the state of the pandemic in Portugal at the moment, will be hosted live. No hybrid/online alternatives are planned at this stage, so only live attendance will be allowed. We may need to limit the number of participants if the context of the pandemic so requires.

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Contact: All questions about submissions should be emailed to forensic.linguistics@letras.up.pt.

Conferences, Latest News

Call for Bids: Biennial Conferences in 2023 & 2025

Call for Bids: Biennial Conferences in 2023 & 2025

The IAFLL Executive Committee solicits proposals from members who wish to host the next biennial conference in 2023. We are also seeking preliminary proposals or inquiries about the 2025 meeting from members who may be keen to host but will not be ready for 2023. Proposals should be emailed by 1st December 2021 to Isabel Picornell (President@iafl.org) and Nicci MacLeod (Secretary@iafl.org). Inquiries meanwhile are welcome. Please ensure that proposals address all of the points identified below:

1. Location: Where will the meeting be held and at what kind of site? Ideally, the conference would take place on a university campus, but hotel-based proposals will also be considered. Attractiveness of the location (what to see and do in the area) is a bonus but not a key factor.

2. Accessibility: How difficult is it for overseas delegates to obtain visas to visit the host country? How far is the location from a well-serviced international airport? How will members reach the meeting location? How far is the conference venue from the town centre? What provisions will be made for delegates with disabilities? Do all the key conference venues have wheelchair access?

3. Accommodation: Where will members stay during the meeting and how much will it cost? How far from the conference venue are the accommodations and how will delegates travel conveniently from the accommodation to the venue? What is the local geography like for the conference facilities themselves? We are particularly keen to understand distances between accommodation and conference facilities and also whether plenary sessions will be held close to or in the same building as parallel sessions. IAFLL would prefer a low-cost university accommodation to be available for the majority of delegates needing accommodation, but with an option of staying in a nearby hotel for those who prefer. If campus accommodation is not available, what facilities are conveniently located near the designated hotels?

4. Fees: What do you anticipate that the fee will be for IAFLL members and non-members? Please note that the gap between the member and non-member registration fees must be at least as much as one year’s membership (applying the student rate as appropriate)? Fee structures will typically include discount for members and for students and this needs to be budgeted. You should also make clear what will be covered and not covered? Will there be a combined fee plus university accommodation rate?

5. Organizing Team: Who will be responsible for organizing the meeting? What previous experience does the local committee have in organizing conferences? If they lack experience in organizing large events, what other experience of theirs will make success likely? How much of the organization can be contracted out (e.g. to university accommodation and catering services)?

6. Financial Support: Beyond the organizers, will there be additional support from an academic department, school, or faculty? Is there likely to be financial support from a university or government source? Will you be insured in one way or another against loss (e.g., by your department or university setting aside emergency funds for this purpose)? What do you intend to do with any profit made?

7. Facilities: What kinds of facilities are available both in the conference rooms and more generally on site? At a minimum, IAFLL would expect: a) sufficiently-sized and equipped rooms with adequate IT and AV equipment; b) an on-call IT team (including weekends) to sort out the inevitable computer and AV mishaps that occur; c) sufficient and adequate catering facilities; d) access to the Internet for delegates at the conference venue; translation facilities if papers will be accepted for presentation in languages other than English. What other facilities are available on campus, in the student residences or on site more generally? Are facilities fully accessible for any disabled member?

8. Dates: The preferred conference dates would fall during the first half of July. If you propose different dates, please address the extent to which delegates from various parts of the world will be able to attend during those dates. You will need, for example, to check on teaching term dates in the US, Europe and Australasia.

We look forward to receiving well-conceived and exciting proposals within the next few months.

On behalf of the IAFL EC
David Wright, Communications Officer